Prayers

Blessings

Liturgical Serv. NOT Divine Liturgy

Divine Liturgy

Prayer for
Child Naming
Glory Be
Falling Asleep in Lord
Hail Mary
Invocation Holy Name
Jesus Prayer
Lord's Prayer/Abana
Naming Child
Nicean Creed
Our Father/Abana/Pater
Sick
Sign of Cross
St Ephrem Prayer
Student
Traveler
Mother Childbirth

Great Lent
Great Lent Time Prayer

Prayer Collections

Daily Life Eparchy of Newton, (Our Lady of the Annunciation (Al Bisharah) in Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States)
Saint Ignatios of Antioch Melkite Greek Catholic Church Please click on Resources for Daily Prayer
Everyday Life of Byzantine Christians St. Ann Melkite Catholic Church
Intercession Eparchy of Newton, (Our Lady of the Annunciation (Al Bisharah) in Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States)
Re-unification Eparchy of Newton, (Our Lady of the Annunciation (Al Bisharah) in Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States)

Prayers to Theotokos
Prayers

Meditations
Meditations

Prayer Theology
Prayer Holy Transfiguration Church

"Ages of ages" and "Ever and ever"
"Ages of ages" and "Ever and ever

Holy CrossWeb Site Home  -  Theology Home  -  Hierarchy Home  -  Locations Home  -  Education Home  -   Stewardship Home  -   Links Home  -   Vendors Home  -  Alphabetical Index Home  -  Thesaurus Home  -  Sitemap Home  -  Arabic fonts

Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center

Catholic-Orthodox Statement Calls for 'Uniform Practice' on Nicene Creed is an article about "The Filioque: A Church-Dividing Issue?"

Current situation of "and the Son" or Filioque in the Creed

Catholic-Orthodox Statement Calls for 'Uniform Practice' on Nicene Creed is an article about "The Filioque: A Church-Dividing Issue?" is an article by Jerry Filteau of the Catholic News Service from the National Catholic Register, 9-15 Nov. 2003.

This article discusses The Filioque: A Church-Dividing Issue? An Agreed Statement of the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation, Saint Paul’s College, Washington, DC, October 25, 2003 from United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

The North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation is an ecumenical standing conference that has been meeting semiannually since it was founded in 1965 under the auspices of the Bishops' Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Standing Conference of Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas (SCOBA). It works in tandem with the Joint Committee of Orthodox and Catholic Bishops which has been meeting annually since 1981.

The North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation is an ecumenical standing conference that has been meeting semiannually since it was founded in 1965 under the auspices of the Bishops' Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Standing Conference of Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas (SCOBA). It works in tandem with the Joint Committee of Orthodox and Catholic Bishops which has been meeting annually since 1981.

WASHINGTON — In an effort to overcome centuries of division, the North American Orthodox-Catholic Consultation has called for "uniform practice" with regard to the ancient Nicene Creed.

This means Catholics would use translations Nonly of the original text, dropping the subsequently added filioque ("and the Son") clause, when reciting the Creed at Mass or using it for catechetics.

The dialogue group also called on each side not to describe the other as heretical and said a 13th-century Western council condemnation aimed at the Orthodox should be declared "no longer applicable."

It urged new joint study and in-depth Catholic-Orthodox dialogue "on the theology of the Holy Spirit, based on the Scriptures and on the whole tradition of Christian theology."

It said this study and dialogue should "distinguish, as far as possible, the theological issues of the origin of the Holy Spirit from the ecclesiological issues of primacy and doctrinal authority in the Church."

At the same time, it is "crucially necessary" that "both our Churches persist in their efforts to reflect — together and separately — on the theology of primacy and synodality within the Church's structures and teaching and pastoral practice," the group said.

For nearly 1,000 years the Catholic Church in the West and the Orthodox Churches of the East have had as one source of division the fact that the West inserted the word filioque in the profession of faith commonly referred to as the Nicene Creed — or more properly as the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed.

That Greek-language creed, which dates to the Council of Constantinople in 381, said the Holy Spirit takes his origin from the Father (in Greek, ek tou patros ekporeuomenori). In Latin, the Greek phrase was translated as ex palre procedit (proceeds from the Father). Under the influence of that translation, churches in the West gradually began to insert filioque into the creed, saying the Spirit "proceeds from the Father 'and the Son.'"

The North American Orthodox-Catholic Consultation is an official theological dialogue sponsored by the Standing Conference of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the Americas, the Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Its' 10,000-word joint statement, "The 'Filioque': A Church-Dividing Issue?" was released Oct. 28 following a meeting in Washington on Oct. 23-25. It was the result of four years of study and dialogue at the consultation's twice-yearly meetings, beginning in October 1999.

The statement outlines the long history of the filioque controversy, including the 1995 Vatican clarification that affirmed the "conciliar, ecumenical, normative and irrevocable value" of the original Greek version of the creed.

The Vatican document argued that the Latin procedit (proceeds) has a slightly different meaning than the Greek ekporeuomenon (originates). It sought to explain to the Orthodox that in adding filioque after the Latin verb, the Church in the West did not intend to — and indeed cannot — contradict the earlier "expression of faith taught and professed by the undivided Church."

The joint statement of the North American consultation pointed out that in the course of growing disagreement over the diverging practices with the creed during the two-and-a-half centuries preceding the East-West schism of 1054, the conflict over the creed became increasingly bound up in politics — "in the growing rivalry between the Carolingian and Byzantine courts, which both now claimed to be the legitimate successors of the Roman Empire."

Especially after 1014, when "the creed, including the filioque, was sung for the first time at a papal Mass," the issue also got increasingly tied to disputes over the exercise of authority in the Church, the statement said.

"Orthodox theology has regarded the ultimate approval by the popes, in the llth century, of the use of filioque in the Latin creed as a usurpation of the dogmatic authority proper to ecumenical councils alone," it said.

On the other side, it said, "In recognizing the universal primacy of the bishop of Rome in matters of faith and of the service of unity, the Catholic tradition accepts the authority of the Pope to confirm the process of conciliar reception and to define what does not conflict with the 'faith of Nicaea' and the apostolic tradition. ... Catholic theology has seen it [papal adoption of the filioque insertion] as a legitimate exercise of his authority to proclaim and clarify the Church's faith."

The joint statement said Catholic and Orthodox theologians need to work together to seek a way to resolve differences between the Orthodox view of councils or synods as the highest Church authority and the Catholic view of the primacy of papal authority. But they said dialogue and study on what the Church believes about the origin of the Holy Spirit ought to be methodologically separated from that issue.

The Orthodox and Catholic theologians acknowledged that "the Greek and Latin theological traditions clearly remain in some tension with each other on the fundamental issue of the Spirit's eternal origin as a distinct divine person."

'These differences, though subtle, are substantial," they said.

Taking their lead from the Pope and the doctrinal congregation document, the participants recommended "that the Catholic Church, as a consequence of the normative and irrevocable dogmatic value of the creed of 381, use the original Greek text alone in making translations of that creed for catechetical and liturgical use."

They also called on the Catholic Church, "following a growing theological consensus," to declare no longer applicable the condemnation, by the Second Council of Lyons in 1274, of those "who presume to deny that the Holy Spirit proceeds eternally from the Father and the Son."

They asked theologians on both sides to "distinguish more clearly between the divinity and hypostatic identity of the Holy Spirit, which is a received dogma of our Churches, and the manner of the Spirit's origin, which still awaits full and final ecumenical resolution."


Web Site Home  -  Theology Home  -  Hierarchy Home  -  Locations Home  -  Education Home  -   Stewardship Home  -   Links Home  -   Vendors Home  -  Alphabetical Index Home  -  Thesaurus Home  -  Sitemap Home  -  Arabic fonts


Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center
Martha Liles
Web URL address: Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center or http://www.mliles.com/melkite/
E-mail: mliles@mliles.com or mliles@mliles.com

Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center is an unofficial Melkite Greek Catholic Web site and has not been reviewed or approved by any Melkite clergy person.
Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center contains a range of World Wide Web sites on Melkite faith, belief, practice, history, etc. Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center does not endorse any World Wide Web site nor takes any responsibility for the contents of any World Wide Web site. Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center offers these links with the understanding that Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center can not vouch for any of the contents on each site. Listing a site does not indicate acceptance nor endorsement of the doctrines / ideas / theology of the World Wide Web site. Please remember that Web sites will change their content and their location. It is the user's responsibility to decide whether or not the content on a particular World Wide Web site is appropripate.

Melkite Greek Catholic Church Information Center is dedicated to my cousins: Bucky (Richard C. Liles) and Shirley (Shirley Jean Liles Buck). Bucky fell asleep in the Lord on Dec. 12, 2000 and Shirley fell asleep in the Lord on Nov. 8, 2001.
O God of all spirits and of all flesh, who have destroyed death, overcome the devil, and given life to the world: grant, O Lord, to the souls of your servants Bucky and Shirley, who has departed from this life, that it may rest in a place of light, in a place of happiness, in a place of peace, where there is no pain, no grief, no sighing. And since You are a gracious God and the Lover of Mankind, forgive him/her every sin he/she has committed by thought, or word, or deed, for there is not a man who lives and does not sin : You alone are without sin, your righteousness is everlasting, and your word is true. You are the Resurrection and the Life, and the repose of your departed servants Bucky and Shirley. O Christ our God, and we send up glory to You, together with your eternal Father and your all-holy, good and life-givng Spirit, now and always and for ages upon ages. Amen.

This site copyright©2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017 Martha Liles. All rights reserved.
Last Updated: Saturday, August 08, 2009, 22:28:24, CDT
The current date and time is: Monday, November 20, 2017, 05:48:13, CST or Monday, November 20, 2017, 11:48:13, GMT